One of the best is the book "The Creature from Jekyll Island", by G. Edward Griffin, which tells the true story of the Rothschilds, Rockefellers, Morgans, and other banking families in Europe and America, from the 1700s to the present . . . and the monetary system that took over the world as a result. It explains the central banking system, the largest of which is the Federal Reserve in the U.S. Once a reader understands what is in that book, he or she will appreciate the wisdom of basing the design of a trust on the common law . . . and he or she will understand why the Rothschilds, Rockefellers, and other banking families have used these very types of trusts for their own asset protection.

Whether you wish to bother educating your prospective banker, or whether it is easier and more desirable to simply go to a different institution where perhaps they already understand some of these things . . . depends upon how much you like the particular institution in question. I have never had to bother educating any bankers, because all I to do was apply at two, three, or four institutions, and one would always say "yes". I didn't think it was important for me to take the time to find out WHY they said "yes". They may or may not have much education in common law or the history of banking, but if they said "yes" to opening the account, who cares what their educational background is? You would then perhaps only care about that if you were to develop a friendship or a close working business relationship with that banker.